The Beer Gatherer

Blogging about Israeli beer in general and Israeli craft beer in particular, following 1001 Beers You Must Try Before You Die and other beer musings.

Archive for the category “Saison”

6-months planning

A very intense week came to a sweet end with booking our plane tickets to the US. We’re only taking off in April, but the itinerary is pretty much set: Beer, cocktails and niece in Southern California, cocktails, beer and nephew in New York, deep south, cocktails, beer and bourbon in between. Early booking means low airfare and six months to dream and plan. Next thing I did after closing the Expedia tab was to google map Port Brewing (10 minutes from Escondido and the niece), and the Bruery (tap room is open til late – we can drop by on our way from the airport, if we’re not too knackered.) Both brew Book Beers, of course, only Orchard White by the latter is now retired. Another reason to live forever, or better, drop this mission. Or maybe, check out the second edition of this stupid publication.

Booking is a good excuse to recap Californian beers I drank and haven’t blogged about yet. Like Lost Abbey 10 Commandments, that’s brewed in the above-mentioned Port Brewing. I had it in late December 2013 (and I’m afraid that’s not the worst backlog in this blog), from friends who brought it back from a beer festival in Italy, if I’m not mistaken. 10% abv. of Belgian Strong Ale. My sample of this 2012 vintage bottle poured murky brown and had a dark tan head. I smelled raisins, hyssop and turmeric,and after a while – a little alcohol. It tasted very fruity, dark and heavy, with a little alcohol in the mouth too. Full-bodied, Belgian-like, deep, spicy finish. Very complex, heavy and difficult to drink.

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Another old one is Sierra Nevada Celebration Ale that we shared at a tasting at The Dancing Camel pub in Florentine, Tel Aviv, in December 2013. Wintery IPA with 6.8% abv. Last time I checked the empty bottle was still adorning the bathroom over there. Clear amber. Slightly spicy, christmas cake aroma, bitter, hoppy, fruity taste, medium-bodied, a little burnt finish. Nice. – these are my tasting notes for this beer.

REL, Dead Swedish Girl and The Actuary, that brought the 10 Commandments, also shared FiftyFifty Imperial Eclipse Stout – from FiftyFifty Brewing. Looking at the date it was sampled, they must have brought it back from Copenhagen Beer Celebration. Eclipse is an imperial stout that aged for ~7 months in oak barrels and  released once a year, in December. Our purple wax-sealed sample was aged in Elijah Craig barrels and was pretty awesome: black with tan head. A little vinous, wood, vanilla. Deep sweet taste and a little spicy. Smooth, syrupy, no carbonation, a little alcoholic aftertaste.

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Next, Green Flash Le Freak – 9.2% Belgian Strong Ale from San Diego. I loved this one. Hazy gold-amber with white head. Fresh, hoppy aroma, grapefruit and pine. Grassy, skunky green taste. Medium body, relatively carbonated, hoppy and floral finish.

Another Californian Imperial Stout is Moylans Ryan Sullivans. we bought the bottle in Høkeren, a cute bottle shop in Copenhagen, in January, because there is no better way to celebrate one’s birthday in a cold and windy city filled with beautiful people. We shared the bottle at Mikkeller & Friends with our ratebeer/untapped buddies Ruben and Dorthe. Black, with a big tan head. Dark chocolate and espresso aroma, rich bitterness, coffee and a hint of sourness in the mouth, full body, very bitter finish, no carbonation. Nothing experimental here, just a nice and solid imperial stout.

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It was Teva Boy who shared The Bruery Saison Rue in early 2014. Quite awesome and heavy on alcohol saison – 8.5% here. Cloudy amber with white head. Bretty, fruity, apple, some toffee and pepper aroma, mildly sour but very drinkable – a little alcoholic too. Full body, slightly alcoholic finish. Very good.

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I believe I had Russian River Supplication sour ale on more than one occasion, but my tasting notes are from a tasting at Teva Boy, of a bottle shared by Sparrow Brewery’s owner and brewmaster Dror, from February 2013(!) Pours clear-to-hazy rusty with white ring. Apple vinegar, air freshener, rose-water aroma, delicate sour taste. Medium body, very fizzy, ciderish finish. I gave it 3.3/5 – that’s around my average rating. I wonder how much I’d give it today.

This ends the Californian backlog. Lots more to drink from The Golden State – the ones from the book that are still available and hundreds more. We have only 5 or 6 days in SoCal before heading to Austin – we’re gonna work hard.

Lost Abbey 10 Commandments, Sierra Nevada Celebration Ale, FiftyFifty Imperial Eclipse Stout, Green Flash Le Freak,  Moylans Ryan Sullivans, The Bruery Saison Rue, Russian River Supplication, are beers #453, #454, #455, #456, #457, #458, and #459 I must Try Before I Die (and thank you Teva Boy!)

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Belgiana

Again, a month-long blog hiatus. Been busy doing, well, stuff. And drinking beer as usual. Beer like Saison de Pipaix by Belgium’s Brasserie à Vapeur that The Beer Greek brought from a recent business trip. It’s a whimsical saison with a complex aroma that contains honey, orange, ginger and candy along with a little rye, and a sweet taste, followed by hints of black pepper, honey and a little anise. Full body, a little anise aftertaste and spicy finish. I am usuallya little repulsed by anise, but here it worked fine.

Bellevaux Black, 6.3% abv. old ale style that I got in a face-to-face trade in Gent last November poured murky brown and ugly, but other than that was quite alright. Malt, cold coffee, mud and some roast in the nose, Roasty, malty, coffee and soft bitterness in the mouth. Medium-to-full body, roasty finish

I have drank Pauwel Kwak many times – it’s been distributed here for years – but only got to rate it last February, the night before we flew to Spain. Drank this Belgian Strong Ale from tap at the Porter and Sons in Tel Aviv. Had I bothered reviewing it when I started this blog, I’m sure I would’ve written a much more raving review, but now it’s just too alcoholic and acetic for my taste and the strong banana liquor taste didn’t amaze me.

Malheur 12 is another Belgian Strong Ale that I didn’t really enjoy. Murky dark brown with a beige head. Sugary, some burn caramel aroma, sugary and very sweet taste. I really only tasted sugar. Fuzzy, medium body, unpleasing alcoholic aftertaste.

I shared my bottle of De Ranke Guldenberg at the same tasting we had Malheur 12. Hazy orange-amber. Sweet, honey aroma, very sweet and a little oxidized taste, honey in the mouth. Smooth, medium body, sweet and heavy finish. Overly sweet and too heavy for me.

My Excellent Little Brother bought me a bottle of Corsendonk Angus from New York. It’s an Abbey Tripel that pours clear gold with a foamy white head. Light fruity aroma, a little red apple notes. Bitter, fruit bubblegum sweetness in the mouth. Medium body, sugary finish, fairly fizzed.

When I logged in to the CMS I thought I’d just wrote about Pipaix and Black but then I went up and down the list and just covered all the Belgian beers I drank in Israel and haven’t written about yet. There are plenty of Belgians I drank in my travels which will be covered some other time.

Saison de Pipaix, Bellevaux Black, Pauwel Kwak, Malheur 12, De Ranke Guldenberg, Corsendonk Angus are beers #409, #410, #411, #412, #413, #414 Beers I Must Try Before I Die.

Three Beers, One Tasting

In the early days of the blog, I used to review a bunch of beers shared in one tasting. It’s an easy way to get a hold on things, really. Whereas it’s no longer a habit, I still sometimes take close-up shots of bottles that were shared at a single tasting that are also listed in The Book. Here’s one of these shots. ludwig-spezial-haand

Two German beers that come in reusable bottles – see the scratch marks above the label. The first is König Ludwig Weissbier, aka Prinzregent Luitpold Weissbier Hell. That’s a German Wheat beer that troubles bought in one of his recent business trips to Germany. It pours cloudy blond with white head and has a juicy aroma of grapefruit, bubblegum, apple juice with some notes of punch-banana ice cream. It tastes mild – a little tarty with light bitterness. Juicy, medium-bodied, light carbonation and apple nectar finish. Pretty good, but can do with some more carbonation and body.

Troubles also shared Tegernseer Spezial, Helles beer, a rather mediocre beer from, well, Tegensee in Bavaria. Clear pale gold-green with white head,  light hoppy bitter aroma, some grass and some phenol. Light citric taste, a little bitter and a little sweet. Light body, medium carbonation, long, mildly bitter finish. Meh.

Last is HaandBryggeriet Ardenne Blond that I got in a trade with a ratebeer buddy. It’s a really cool saison that hails from Norway. My bottle had weird floaties that swam in hazy blondliquid covered by white head. Sweet floral aroma with some white summer fruit graced my nostrils and a tarty taste, a little plastic-y, with some citrus that definitely didn’t feel hop-derived met my mouth. Smooth, medium-bodied with mild carbonation and long, bitter and tarty finish beer that’s both tasty and refreshing.

 

König Ludwig Weissbier, Tegernseer Spezialare and HaandBryggeriet Ardenne Blond are beers #366, #367 and #368 I Must Try Before I Die.

Bloggin Belgian Beer

As the washing machine’s doing its second weekend run, opened my laptop, with the following tasks in mind:
1. Catching up on Ratebeer
2. Booking hotel/ Air B&B rooms in Brussels and Ghent.

Being the ADD person that I am, as I was typing my ratings and updating my 1001 list, I started thinking about this blog and my Belgian beer 1001 status and decided to log in and continue catching up on this blog, with Belgian beer in mind. There are 118 Belgian beers listed in the 1001 Beers You Must Try Before You Die book. That’s 11.78% of the beers in the book and it kinda makes sense. Out of the 118 I drank 66, 55.9% of the beers listed, but reviewed 54. I have 12 beers to write about, then drink and review a few that are available in Israel and in my cellar until November, in order to clean the desk before the long, and much anticipated weekend in November*.

So in mostly alphabetical order, here we go. Since it’s a long list, # of Beer I Must Try Before I Die will appear on the side of the list:
#335: Achel 8 Blond – I drank it last November, I think. 8% abv, Belgian Strong Ale. It pours lear gold-yellow with white head. Some petrol, then spiciness, then yeasty bitter aroma. Yeasty bitterness in the mouth, that distinctive Belgian taste. Medium-to-full body, fruity yeasty finish.

#336, #337: Arabier and Oerbier, both by De Dolle, with naive and beautifully illustrated labels. Arabier is Strong Belgian Ale, 8% abv, drank in November. Pours hazy yellow golden with a big, white head. Sweet, dried apricot aroma, apricot in the mouth, then very bitter. Apricot aftertaste, medium-to-full body, carbonated. I shared Oerbier at the same tasting back in November. This Belgian Strong Ale goes to 9% abv. It pours deep brown and almost opaque, with a frothy, light tan head. Fruity aroma, dried fig. Tastes bitter and nice and again, of dried figs. Full body, fruity bitter finish, a little sour wine. I liked them both, with no particular preference between them.

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#338: Brasserie Dupont‘sAvec les Bons Voeux – An Abbey-style tripel that The Laughing Buddha Beer crew brought from their beer and metal trip to Belgium earlier this year. 9.5% Abv. Clear white gold with a foamy white head. I smelled some sour notes, vinegar and hints of fruit aroma and the taste was sweet and very mildly sour. Light body for this high abv., soft carbonation, a little sour finish.

#339: Hercule Stout – one of my favourite beers from Belgium! The Secret Agent and I drank it for the first time when we traveled there 3 years ago, right before I began rating and blogging here. For the sake of my log, Skipper Tom shared a bottle of this goodness. It’s an imperial stout, with 9% abv. Pours black with beige head. Slightly vegetal aroma, a little smooth and sweet taste that then turns smoky. Dry, wood and roastiness in the mouth. medium-bodied, long, roasty finish. Again, really good.

#340 and #341 are both from Liefmans. The Secret Agent and I shared a bottle of Liefmans Cuvée Brut at home a couple of weeks ago, in a lazy, hot weekend afternoon. This is a Liefmans Oud Bruin-based kried that’s fermented with whole cherries for about 12 months and then blended with Oud Bruin and Goudenband from the same brewery. At 6% abv. it’s a complex, yet refreshing beer, with a very dark ruby-red colour, cherry, some oak and cinnamon buns aroma, and a tarty, cherry taste with a little sugar. Medium body, fruity aftertaste with a little peat. Tasty. Liefmans Goudanband was also a special purchase by the Laughing Buddha crew. They shared this beer with us at a tasting at Stas’ in one of the most frightening nights The Secret Agent and I have ever experienced. Beer tasting was a temporary relief from stress and fear. But I’m drifting away – blame it on the ADD. Goudanband pours murky brown with beige head and has a slightly sour aroma of grapes and cranberries. It tastes very, very sour! Not hostile, though. Medium-bodied, a little flat (but in a good way), and sourish finish.

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Are you still here?

#342 is Monk’s Cafe’ Flemish Sour Ale – don’t remember how I got it – Maybe my Excellent Little Brother bought it for me? Brewed by Brouwerij Van Steenberge for Monk’s Cafe’ in Philadelphia, its commercial description reads “We blend young and old beers to make this mildy tart sour ale. Light bodied with a lactic/sour nose and a bit of sweet and sour in the finish. Very refreshing!” It was a little too harsh for me. Not a heavy beer, only 5.5% abv, but with its wort, malt, date honey and a little sour aroma, sour, a little like cheap, sweet red wine,taste, light body, no carbonation and its slightly sourish finish, it wasn’t really to my taste.

#343 is Petrus Oud Bruin, Third in this listing from the Laughing Buddhas. This is a sour ale that I quite liked. It has clear dark brown with beige head, walnut, cinnamon aroma, mildly sour taste with cinnamon undertones, fair carbonation, medium body and a lingering, apricot-sourness finish. 5.5% abv. here too.

#344: guess who brought a bottle of Saison Dupont? Yup, it’s Ariel T., Stas and Vova again. I like Saisons and this is a good example for this type of beers. Clear gold with frothy white foam. Slightly sour aroma with notes of apricot and banana, very mildly sourness in the mouth and very drinkable. Medium body, smooth, creamy texture, long and a little ripe citrus finish.

#345: The Secret Agent and I shared a bottle of Piraat on my birthday weekend getaway to Prague last January. We were at the Nota Bene, a basement bar dedicated mostly to Belgian beers and a great relief from some horrendous fruity beers we drank nearby. Clear brown with a huuuuge, frothy white head. Oatmeal cookie, biscuit and warm spices aroma. Alcoholic, sweet, esteric fruitiness in the mouth. Medium-bodied, sweet, esteric finish. I liked it but may have not liked it that much in a different setting. 10.5% abv.

And finally, at #346 – Rodenbach Grand Cru, which we shared with my Big Brother-In-Law last March, during our family trip in Romania. We bought the bottle at the Beer O’Clock in Bucharest and opened it on the night Big Brother-In-Law, his wife and da niece arrived from California. I recall that we were all tired – the Californian branch from the long flight, us from the long ride back from Constanta. So, what did I think about the beer? Clear reddish brown with cream-coloured foam, Candy, pickle-juice, alcohol and sour wine aroma, rather delicate sourness and fruity taste. Light body, delicate fizz and relatively easy to drink.

Phew – washing machine went quiet a looong time ago and writing about all this beer made me tasty. Gonna get some cold soda from the fridge and find accommodation in Ghent.

*While I’ll be spending as much time as possible in cafe’s, the purpose of this trip is visiting WWI sites and attending Einstürzende Neubauten’s premiere concert in Diksmude. Still, looking for beer tips and recommendations, especially for Ieper and Diksmude. Please comment if you have any.

Bières de France. Seven of them.

It’s time for another omnibus entry and this time 6 beers from France, out of the 25 that are in the book. Quite an impressive number for a country that isn’t really known as a beer destination. However, many months ago we realized that 1001 Beers You Must Try Before You Die isn’t up to par with the current beer trend. Suffice to say that France has more than twice representatives in the book than Denmark. Well, again, with more than a little help from our friends we pulled up some goodies.

langelusThe Beer Greek, who gets paid to do beer business and traveling to SIAL Food Show in Paris is a part of his job, brought Annoeullin L’Angelus Bière de Froment that has a beautiful, rustic label, depicting a peasant couple in a wheat field – very Bière de Garde-ish. It was a weird beer. Pours clear straw with apple, vinegar and a little fuel aroma and a very sour taste that surprisingly has some candy sweetness too. The body is light and the texture feels somewhat oily – weird.

Like a true, devoted beergeek, Teva Boy was on the lookout for cool stuff to bring and drinketoile during a romantic winter getaway to the City of Light.  Thiriez Etoile Du Nord is an alright Saison that he shared at a tasting. I got to drink the bottom of the bottle, which is usually fine by me, as I like the yeastiness. The cloudy, weird, hay-like colour of the liquid in my glass was due to all this goodness. I smelled cookie dough, raisins and jasmine. And tasted mild, lingering bitterness with some cucumber. Smooth texture, light-to-medium body, leafy green vegetable finish make Etoile Du Nord a fresh, springy beer, though we tasted it in the winter.

biare-de-brie-ambraceBière De Brie Ambrée has a cute name, cloudy-opaque muddy brown colour with a dissolving frothy cream-coloured head, earthy, grass and spices aroma, and it tastes like Belgian ale: yeasty, sweetish and good. It is full bodied, carbonated and has sweet finish. I like it alot.

3 Monts is from another family-owned brewery, St. Sylvestre. Clear light golden colour and a 3-Montsfrothy white head, straw, sweet and some corn aroma, vegetal, sweet taste and a light body makes it an OK, thirst-quenching drink.

CuveeDesJonquillesCuvée des Jonquilles by Brasserie Au Baron is my favourite French beer. A fine Bière de Garde, that paints the glass in cloudy pale amber protected by a big white head, it smells of sugar, spice, allspice and other nice aromata such as yeast, flowers and earth. The taste is fruity, faintly sour. Medium body, fizzy, long finish. Balanced and good.

We also gathered our French loot: From our weekend in Switzerland we brought Adelscott,adelscott Scotch Ale made with peat-smoked malt. I’m a sucker for anything smoky but was quite surprised to learn that this is a Heineken beer because smoked beer is not something you’d expect the giants would play with. Well, this beer pours clear dark golden (whisky colour?) with white ring. It has honey and malt aroma that is slightly grainy and has notes of pipe tobacco which I quite like. It tastes very sweet and a little smoky I guess I would’ve liked it better if it was very smoky and a little sweet. Light body, sticky, pipe finish and smooth carbonation.

Last for this entry is Gavroche which is another Bière de Garde brewed by St. Sylvestre, but gavrocheunlike 3 Monts, tasted pretty nasty. The Beer Greek tried to convince me to ignore what I tasted. He had tried the beer before and my bottle was clearly damaged during storage or shipping or something. I’m on a run and I have over 700 beers to complete my mission; no time to wait and no money to spend on another bottle :/ my sample smelled of spoiled cheesecake – an aroma that can’t be described as good or appropriate but it was nothing compared to the taste – sour, lemony and unpleasing. The beer must be old. The 1001 book tells stories about hop spice and roast and dark fruit but I don’t need a book and in this case a Beer Greek to tell me the beer’s off – it really stood out. I’m ticking this one and hope to bump into another, better bottle, though I can’t count on it.

These 7 French brews were beers #235, #236, #237, #238, #239, #240 and #241 I Must Try Before I Die.

Belgian Triplet

It’s too hot. Too hot and muggy to drink anything heavier than Helles, let alone write anything longer than a snarky Facebook status about the arbitrary and dangerous recent beer tax raise or the spin-war those who run this country are determined to launch. However, I still drink heavier stuff and still determined to go on with this blog and the 1001 project and beer writing in general, even if it means tasting Belgian ales in the middle of the Tel Avivian summer and then re-live the experience by looking at the tasting notes and typing.

The people we taste with rarely ever bring Belgian Ales to the sessions. Scandinavian stuff?Oh yeah! American beer? Bring ’em in! Italian brews? The more, the merrier. Belgian ales? Unless it’s Crazy Sour Sessions or true rarities, usually they won’t be found on the table*. It’s too heavy, too spiced and not too interesting to the seasoned drinker, I guess.  However, the Israeli market is quite fond of Belgian Ales with it’s high alcoholic percentage and sweetness. Maredsous, the Dwarf beer and Chimay are popular around here and beer importers always expand the selection of available Belgians. Besides the major players, every now and then the local beer hunters and gatherers bump into new bottles on the shelves, brought by unknown businesses that for one reason or another decide to get into the importing game, either because they read too many press releases about the raising popularity of beer or because they drank something fantastic they had to share with the world. I think that De Halve Maan beers that The Secret Agent and I spotted on the shelves of the local homebrew supply business Beer-D in the spring of 2011, is an example of the latter. Why else would a computer hardware company distribute beer from Bruges?

The three types of beer marketed by the computer company, Straffe Hendrik triple and quadruple as well as Brugse Zot, were a rare sight at the beer shops. Then it went on sale at the Ninkasi, Beer-D’s pub and pretty much disappeared from the market. We bought bottles at Beerandbeyond’s sale last spring. They seemed pretty old back then and I wouldn’t be surprised if they were from the same batch as the ones we bought at Beer-D’s a year before.

The Secret Agent and I remembered liking those beers, but lowered our expectations because of the age of the bottles and more importantly the shift in our particular taste, that’s been less tolerant towards Belgian stuff. The floating particles that were pretty apparent while pouring the clear amber liquid kinda turned me off. It also tasted and smelled old and cider-like with dominant yeast and toffee in the nose and sour in the mouth. I recall it was much better last time we had it.

Last May The Not-Yet Nicked brought us 2 25cl bottles from the beer tour he guided in Belgium. I sent him a list of 80+ items and told him to grab whatever. Didn’t look for rarities (and at that point preferred not to spend money on them anyway), just for stuff that’s unavailable here. He returned with  bottles of Rodenbach and Dupont Biolégère, both we shared at tastings.

Biolégère is an organic Saison by the creators of Saison Dupont which we fondly remember from our trip to Belgium last October, but like too many other organic beers we got to sample, this one wasn’t satisfying. Dry aroma with some yeast and limestone and a little sour, a little sweet taste.  It has light body and fruity finish and I won’t regret never drinking it again.  Rodenbach is a Flemish sour ale. I’m becoming more and more tolerant towards sour beer so drinking it wasn’t too shocking. Sourness and cherry in the nose, malt, sour, sweet undertones in the mouth and a medium body with hops that pop up towards the finish.

These were beers #95, #96, #97 I must try before I die. 3 more to the 100.

*The above sentence is based on gut feelings and not on real statistics.

The Big Recap

Over the past few weeks we have accumulated dozens of tasting notes. The thought of turning all of them into an entry makes me cringe, so here’s the dozen that’s also in the book. Chronology makes no sense in this sort of entry, so stuff is sorted out according to the 1001 Beers You Must Try  Before You Die chapters: Amber, Blond, Dark and Special. Arbitrary, sort of, but if it works, it works.

We got our bottle of Alesmith IPA from The Secret Agent’s parents, who visited the Californian branch back in February. We loved this beer. Pours hazy amber  with a frothy white head, papaya, lime and hemp aroma and an extremely, bitter, green taste. Medium body, soft carbonation and a nice bitter finish close one of the best IPA’s I’ve tasted to date.

Before the start

Left Hand Sawtooth Ale has one of the ugliest labels I’ve seen in a long while. Like a scary number of fellow beergeeks I am a left-handed and thus have a soft spot for the brewery’s name. My default sympathy didn’t really help the beer, which was ok, but not too thrilling. Orangy copper colour, hazy, little light tan head. Hoppy aroma – light evergreen, flowery. Delicate bitterness in the mouth. Smooth texture, medium body, delicate finish.

The (very soon to be) Texan got his bottle of Grottenbier in the strangest trade of all: beer for mini copies of Hebrew-printed Psalms book. Yes he did. Was it worth it? In my opinion it was. A pretty decent beer for some useless pieces of paper. It’s a decent beer that  poured dark brown and had a cloudy, off-white head. Sweet spicy aroma – clove and nutmeg, Mildly sweet and spicy taste, a little anise. Heavy-medium body, lively carbonation, long, tangy finish.

Gearys Hampshire Special Ale was quite a disappointment. We all agreed that there was something wrong with the bottle. Murky honey colour, aroma that reminded me of pink Bazooka Joe bubblegum and band-aid. It tasted sweet, then weirdly bitter. Pretty ugh.

The Actuary’s wife went to Cyprus with her work, and brought back a bottle of Leon, a shitty Cyprian beer, and three bottles of Brasserie Du Bocq’s La Gauloise.  La Gauloise Blonde, so I have discovered while flipping through the book, is there, surprisingly enough in the Blond category. Cloudy pale golden, bubbly white foam. Candy, caramel, conserved peach aroma and bitter-sweet taste. Light body, smooth finish. Drank better Belgian ales in my life, but fair enough.

The BeerGreek, before the tasting and just before becoming a dad for the second time,

I have recently created a Google Docs spreadsheet to help me follow the mission. The Dead Swedish Girl asked me to share the list with him. He went through and spotted Birra Moretti Baffo D’Oro that The big Bear’s dad brought from Italy. We drank it at a beer tasting I have already written about, but overlooked it on my list. Not much to write about. It’s a generic pale lager. You drank one, you drank most.

Sierra Nevada Bigfoot Barleywine Style Ale is another story though. A little skunky aroma and overall hoppy bitterness in the mouth and finish, this one was decent beer.

We drank a bunch of cool dark beers, too: Porterhouse Wrasslers XXXX Stout was one of the better bottles opened in a small, homey tasting The Secret Agent and I hosted last week. Rich smokey, peaty aroma accompanied by berries and a smokey, acetic, bitter taste. I live for smoked beer.

Saranac Black Forest was quite disappointing as well. I like Schwarzbier but this one wasn’t more than fair: Velvety wine-grapes aroma, grainy, somewhat sweet malt taste.

But I loved, loved Victory Storm King! Black liquid, frothy tan head, soft, bitter taste and a rich wine and chocolate liquor aroma. Well-carbonated, pretty easy to drink despite the 9.1%abv. My only complaint is the too-short finish.

I think it was Middie Bear who fixed us with a bottle of Nøgne Ø Imperial Stout. Don’t know how this HopHead put his paws on this one, but I sure don’t complain; roast was everywhere: in the nose (along with some alcohol and liquor), in the mouth (accompanied by bitterness) and in the finish. Texture was oily, beer was great.

one of the cutest beer-label dogs around 🙂

How does AriHell find people who deliver him exotic and obscure beer is beyond my comprehension, but that’s a skill I’d like to learn. He is the one who brought Jolly Pumpkin Bam Biere to the table (along with another dog-endorsed label).  It’s a mild-tasting Saison, sour in the mouth and  pissful litter-box aroma. Pretty hardcore with complementary cloudy golden colour.

So that’s it for now. Attended a festive tasting last night and again crashing into a sour tasting tonight, so more posts are on their way. Meanwhile, those were 12 more beers I Must Try Before I Die: 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73.

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